3. Downfall and resurrection

Keke closed her eyes and danced. Keke closed her eyes and danced like crazy. After dancing like crazy for two, three hours, and getting hotter, and frenzier and crazier, the drumming stopped. Like a zebra taken by the throat, Keke slowly fell to the dusty ground. The mostly black audience ignored Keke, embarrassed by the scene of a grey faced, turkey necked, red haired woman in her late forties, perhaps early fifties, who had reached some kind of private trance that got slightly out of hand. But they had seen this many times: the white woman, mostly of European origin, who suddenly, and quite dramatically, and mostly much too late in life, discovered her 'inner rhythm', danced like crazy, and eventually passed out. The drummers started packing up their drums. Except for one man, or should I say gentleman, dressed in a white suit, white loafers, white hat, who walked to Keke with a plastic bottle of ice cold mineral water, kneeled down beside her and in a delicate way, like a doctor, squirted some water in her face. Keke immediatly sat up, rubbed the water out of her eyes and blurted out: 'Excuse me? But? Who are you? You like Duke Ellington!' The man in the white suit smiled, and said, with a Barry White bariton: 'I am no Duke Ellington, missis. I'm the leader and founder of the drumming circle, and whether you like it or not, I am the man you just fell in love with.'